Koffietafelboek en Vryfees geleentheid

Hallo Almal!Sommer lekker nuus! 'n Groep baie talentvolle fotograwe het pas 'n fantastiese koffietafelboek die lig laat sien. Vir die van julle wat die Vryfees gaan bywoon en sommer bietjie fotografiese inspirasie soek, loer gerus of julle die volgende kan bywoon:

Nou, bietjie meer oor die boek (en ek hoop dat Gilbert ons baie meer gaan vertel oor die produksie daarvan, want ek verneem net dit is 'n puik stuk werk - en gemeet aan die volgende foto's gaan dit pragtig wees!).

Hier is 'n paar foto's uit die boek:

Hierdie ene deur Francois van der Watt...

En dan hierdie besonderse "storiefoto" deur Theresa Nel:

En Gilbert se pragtige foto:

Nou ja, net om julle 'n voorsmakie te gee van wat nog in die boek is. hier is die Inleiding:

Introduction


 When we define the Photograph as a motionless image, this does not mean only that the figures it represents do not move; it means that they do not emerge, do not leave: they are anesthetized and fastened down, like butterflies.
– Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography


Photography is closely tied with history, with memory, with retention and forgetting.
On looking at a photograph of Napoleon’s youngest brother, Jerome, taken in 1852, Roland Barthes was struck by the realization that he is looking at the eyes that looked at Napoleon. Similarly, but in the other direction of time’s arrow, seeing a picture of his mother as a child he was saddened by the realization that one day she was going to die, an event that had already happened. “Whether or not the subject is already dead, every photograph is this catastrophe,” he wrote in Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography. Photography is carefully tied to our emotional life, and to the way we experience time and space.
The eye, like the lens, delights in what is beautiful and grandiose as much as it does in detail; it perceives equally what is near or far away. There is something in our nature, in the evolution of the way our brains processes information that responds to the harmonious. That is why it delights us to discover the way that patterns in nature corresponds to Fibonacci sequence, or how the proportions of things or the unfolding of visual processes stays true to the principle of the Golden Mean.
But nature’s intention is not to delight or entertain us. The colours of autumn leaves or the hue of flowers is not for our enjoyment, but to attract or signal, or to repel. Colours and patterns have evolved with survival in mind. Nature is mostly pragmatic where everything has function: man can thus be the only species to derive aesthetic pleasure from natural beauty.
Photography as an art form has proven itself to be equally resilient and persistent. From its very beginning it was tied to art and to scientific discovery, and it remains the case to this day. It has benefitted enormously from technical developments, and modern software manipulation of photographic images has almost generated a new art form, ensuring that photography stays current and innovative.
Whether space telescopes or tiny cameras built in to cell phones - the quality of the images has improved exponentially, and technical innovation has put unbelievable control and tools into the hands of the average photographer. The result is that the divide between the work of established professionals and amateurs continues to decline, as this book so amply proves.
Photography can delight and amaze us; it can touch hearts and bring about change. It can stop time, and do battle with the amnesia that is part of the human condition. Never in its history has photography been producing images in such quantities and of such quality. Never before has the record of history, nature, nations, or individuals, been preserved to such an extent. Photography as an evolutionary art form keeps on reinventing itself, and as such it is a force to be reckoned with.
 
Johann de Lange (poet)

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Comment by Piet Roos on July 6, 2012 at 1:37pm

Waar en wanneer?

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